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Maria Francesca Sfondrini   Dr.  University Educator/Researcher 
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Maria Francesca Sfondrini published an article in January 2019.
Top co-authors
Andrea Scribante

92 shared publications

Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Section of Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy

Mauro Cozzani

85 shared publications

Via Fontevivo 21 N, 19125 La Spezia, Italy

Paola Gandini

17 shared publications

Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Section of Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy;(R.A.);(P.G.);(M.F.S.)

Anna Menini

8 shared publications

Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy

Paolo Cozzani

1 shared publications

Private Practice, La Spezia, Italy

71
Publications
64
Reads
10
Downloads
92
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2003 - 2019)
Total number of journals
published in
 
19
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Deglutizione atipica, anomalie occlusali e alterazioni posturali: esiste una correlazione? Maria Francesca Sfondrini, Francesca Ferrante, Greta Sala, P... Published: 01 January 2019
Dental Cadmos, doi: 10.19256/d.cadmos.01.2019.04
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Buccolingual Inclination Control of Upper Central Incisors of Aligners: A Comparison with Conventional and Self-Ligating... Maria Francesca Sfondrini, Paola Gandini, Tommaso Castroflor... Published: 29 November 2018
BioMed Research International, doi: 10.1155/2018/9341821
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
The upper incisors torque expression is essential for the orthodontic treatment accuracy. Various orthodontic devices are claimed to have different inclination control capacity. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the radiographic buccolingual inclination of upper incisors in patients treated with three different orthodontic techniques. Conventional brackets (Victory, 3M), self-ligating appliances (Damon Q, Ormco), and aligners (Invisalign, Align Technology) were tested. Cephalometric data of 25 patients with similar skeletal and dental pretreatment parameters were collected for each technique. Position changes of upper central incisors were assessed with radiographic evaluation before and after therapy. Three different parameters were considered: 11∧SnaSnp, 11∧Ocl and I+ TVL. All variables were measured before (T0) and after (T1) treatment and their variation over treatment was assessed. When evaluating angular measurements, 11∧SnaSnp and 11∧Ocl angles showed the highest numeric variation with conventional brackets. Lowest values were reported with aligners. However, the differences among various techniques were not significant for both angles (P>0.05). Also I+ TVL linear value variation did not show significant differences among the different groups tested (P>0.05). Conventional multibrackets appliance showed the highest incisal position variations over treatment, but the differences among various groups were not significantly different.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Failure load and stress analysis of orthodontic miniscrews with different transmucosal collar diameter Maria Francesca Sfondrini, Paola Gandini, Roberto Alcozer, P... Published: 01 November 2018
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, doi: 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2018.07.032
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Travel beyond Clinical Uses of Fiber Reinforced Composites (FRCs) in Dentistry: A Review of Past Employments, Present Ap... Andrea Scribante, Pekka K. Vallittu, Mutlu Özcan, Lippo V. J... Published: 22 October 2018
BioMed Research International, doi: 10.1155/2018/1498901
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
The reinforcement of resins with short or long fibers has multiple applications in various engineering and biomedical fields. The use of fiber reinforced composites (FRCs) in dentistry has been described in the literature from more than 40 years. In vitro studies evaluated mechanical properties such as flexural strength, fatigue resistance, fracture strength, layer thickness, bacterial adhesion, bonding characteristics with long fibers, woven fibers, and FRC posts. Also, multiple clinical applications such as replacement of missing teeth by resin-bonded adhesive fixed dental prostheses of various kinds, reinforcement elements of dentures or pontics, and direct construction of posts and cores have been investigated. In orthodontics, FRCs have been used also for active and passive orthodontic applications, such as anchorage units, en-masse movement units, and postorthodontic tooth retention. FRCs have been extensively tested in the literature, but today the advances in new technologies involving the introduction of nanofillers or new fibers along with understanding the design principles of FRC devices open new fields of research for these materials both in vitro and in vivo. The present review describes past and present applications of FRCs and introduces some future perspectives on the use of these materials.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Fibromatosi gengivale ereditaria: caso clinico Marina Consuelo Vitale, Maria Francesca Sfondrini, Andrea Sc... Published: 01 September 2018
Dental Cadmos, doi: 10.19256/d.cadmos.09.2018.10
DOI See at publisher website
Article 3 Reads 1 Citation Reliability of Orthodontic Miniscrews: Bending and Maximum Load of Different Ti-6Al-4V Titanium and Stainless Steel Temp... Andrea Scribante, Mona A. Montasser, Eman Saad Radwan, Luisa... Published: 05 July 2018
Materials, doi: 10.3390/ma11071138
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) have been introduced into orthodontic clinical practice in order to allow tooth movements while avoiding strain on adjacent teeth. Miniscrews are available in the market with different diameters and materials. Accordingly, the purpose of the present report was to measure and compare the forces to bend and fracture different mini implants. Ti-6Al-4V titanium and stainless steel TADs of different manufacturers (Spider ScrewHDC; Mini Implants–Leone; Benefit–Orteam; Storm–Kristal) were evaluated. Two different diameters (1.5 mm and 2.0 mm) were tested. The sample included 10 unused specimens for each group, blocked in an Instron Universal Testing Machine, and a shear load was applied at the neck of the miniscrew. The force to bend the miniscrew was measured at 0.1 mm and 0.2 mm deflections. Also, the maximum force before screw fracture was recorded. Data were submitted for statistical analysis. Results showed significantly higher forces for 2.0 mm than 1.5 mm screws, both at 0.1 mm and 0.2 mm deflections and at maximum load. Moreover, no significant differences were reported between titanium and stainless steel miniscrews of equal diameters.
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